sz.kidsadvices.com
Ware

Vaccines prohibited during pregnancy

Vaccines prohibited during pregnancy



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.



Some vaccines are recommended in pregnancy because of their beneficial and protective effects, but other vaccines are forbidden in pregnancy, either because they affect the fetus or have an increased risk of miscarriage, or because their effect on the fetus is still being studied and is not known.
Vaccinations for:
• Pojar (measles, heart);
• Oreion (epidemic parotiditis);
• Rubeola (eyelid);
• Poliomyelitis;
• chicken pox;
• Measles, mumps and rubella (ROR);
• BCG (tuberculosis);
• Yellow chillies;
• Swine flu (nasal spray variant);
If you have done one of these before pregnancy it is advisable to postpone the birth of a baby for several months - some of these vaccines contain live viruses. Your doctor should carefully evaluate with you the risks and benefits of taking these vaccines during pregnancy.
Although the HPV vaccine seems to be fine for the mother and baby, it should not be given during pregnancy. Its effects are still being studied in the laboratory and it has not been approved for pregnancy training. The HPV vaccine was recommended for pregnant women at first, but a number of pregnant women who were given this vaccine lost their babies or had babies born with deformities.
Experts know very little about the effects of these vaccines on the fetus:
• Poliomyelitis;
• Hepatitis A;
• Anthrax;
• Japanese encephalitis;
• Typhoid fever;
• Smallpox (windpipe);
• Yellow chillies;
There are opinions that claim that the mercury-based substance called Thimerosal from the swine flu vaccine affects the fetus and should be banned in pregnancy.
If you are worried, look for vaccines that do not contain this preservative. Mercury reaching the placenta has effects on the fetus, mental retardation and motor impairment.
Other vaccines that may present a risk to pregnant women
Moms around the world have complained about the effects of Pandemrix vaccines (which is not recommended for pregnant women, children under 18 and older than 60) and Gardasil. The first led to the newborn's illnesses and deficiencies, and the second led to the miscarriage or death of the baby immediately after birth.
Pregnant vaccination is generally associated with an increased risk of autism, psychosis or other neurological problems when the baby reaches adolescence or adulthood. This aspect is completely ignored by those who manufacture and recommend vaccines.